Community

The Great Rendezvous and Pow Wow

Staff photos/Rhonda Silence


Left: Visiting the Grand Portage National Monument during the annual Rendezvous Days encampment is like stepping back in history. These kids don’t seem to miss the electronic entertainment of today. They found pleasure in a simple swing, a carved rocking horse and a pine branch! Above left: The historic fur trade depot was bustling with activity. The “Rugged Voyageur” competition once again included fire starting. This young voyageur was speedy with his flint. Above middle: There were many interesting workshops, including one on the bagpipes of the Northwest Company. Piper Jeremy delighted attendees not only with his technical and historical knowledge, but with his musical talents as well. Above right: Jerry Johnson of Sunfish Lake, MN worked to craft a new “noggin” cup, the little cup voyageurs tied to their belts on their journeys. Asked if it was hard work, he grinned. “Patience is a virtue,” said Johnson. Left: Visiting the Grand Portage National Monument during the annual Rendezvous Days encampment is like stepping back in history. These kids don’t seem to miss the electronic entertainment of today. They found pleasure in a simple swing, a carved rocking horse and a pine branch! Above left: The historic fur trade depot was bustling with activity. The “Rugged Voyageur” competition once again included fire starting. This young voyageur was speedy with his flint. Above middle: There were many interesting workshops, including one on the bagpipes of the Northwest Company. Piper Jeremy delighted attendees not only with his technical and historical knowledge, but with his musical talents as well. Above right: Jerry Johnson of Sunfish Lake, MN worked to craft a new “noggin” cup, the little cup voyageurs tied to their belts on their journeys. Asked if it was hard work, he grinned. “Patience is a virtue,” said Johnson.


Left: Also hard at work at the voyageur encampment was Carol Cheney of Angora, MN. She was spinning fibers from the inner coat of a bison. She said it was challenging, as bison hair is shorter than sheep. However, it ends up being much softer, said Cheney. Above: This well-dressed couple enjoyed some time in the shade, discussing different fabrics of the 1800s at a textile workshop. Left: Also hard at work at the voyageur encampment was Carol Cheney of Angora, MN. She was spinning fibers from the inner coat of a bison. She said it was challenging, as bison hair is shorter than sheep. However, it ends up being much softer, said Cheney. Above: This well-dressed couple enjoyed some time in the shade, discussing different fabrics of the 1800s at a textile workshop.


Life at Rendezvous was not all work. Communities were sometimes visited by puppeteers. The fellow offering this Punch and Judy show described the performance as The Simpsons or Tom and Jerry of the day. He stressed that it was only a “cartoon” when Punch beat his wife, his horse, the village doctor and tricked the hangman into his own noose. Life at Rendezvous was not all work. Communities were sometimes visited by puppeteers. The fellow offering this Punch and Judy show described the performance as The Simpsons or Tom and Jerry of the day. He stressed that it was only a “cartoon” when Punch beat his wife, his horse, the village doctor and tricked the hangman into his own noose.

The Grand Portage Traditional Powwow includes many meaningful moments, such as the naming of the Grand Portage Royalty. Thirteen youths bravely danced in the following categories: Tiny Tot Brave Alex and Antonio Santos; Tiny Tot Princess Holly Dahl and Ashlyn Childs; Junior Brave Isaiah Deschampe and Hunter Childs; Junior Princess Kassia Deschampe, Selene Lien, Christina James; Senior Brave Jaden Aubid and Cody Tesser; and Junior Princess Samantha Scalise and ShaeLynn Novitsky. They all were wonderful and the judges had a tough time selecting the 2012 Royalty, pictured above (L-R) Senior Brave Cody Tesser, Senior Princess Samantha Scalise, Junior Brave Isaiah Deschampe, Junior Princess Kassia Deschampe, Tiny Tot Brave Antonio Santos, with his mom, Lena and Tiny Tot Princess Holly Dahl with her mom, Kristin Kleett. The Grand Portage Traditional Powwow includes many meaningful moments, such as the naming of the Grand Portage Royalty. Thirteen youths bravely danced in the following categories: Tiny Tot Brave Alex and Antonio Santos; Tiny Tot Princess Holly Dahl and Ashlyn Childs; Junior Brave Isaiah Deschampe and Hunter Childs; Junior Princess Kassia Deschampe, Selene Lien, Christina James; Senior Brave Jaden Aubid and Cody Tesser; and Junior Princess Samantha Scalise and ShaeLynn Novitsky. They all were wonderful and the judges had a tough time selecting the 2012 Royalty, pictured above (L-R) Senior Brave Cody Tesser, Senior Princess Samantha Scalise, Junior Brave Isaiah Deschampe, Junior Princess Kassia Deschampe, Tiny Tot Brave Antonio Santos, with his mom, Lena and Tiny Tot Princess Holly Dahl with her mom, Kristin Kleett.

The Grand Portage Traditional Powwow had nearly 500 dancers in a variety of regalia. Above left: Along with intricate beadwork, beautiful natural materials—feathers and quills—adorn this dancer’s regalia. Above right: This jingle dancer followed emcee Murphy Thomas’s call to “dance your style” with a big smile. The Grand Portage Traditional Powwow had nearly 500 dancers in a variety of regalia. Above left: Along with intricate beadwork, beautiful natural materials—feathers and quills—adorn this dancer’s regalia. Above right: This jingle dancer followed emcee Murphy Thomas’s call to “dance your style” with a big smile.

Above: The Grand Entry on Saturday, August 11 was a feast of sound and color. Right: Seven Grand Portage women were given a special pink shawl in memory of a loved one lost to cancer or in honor of their survival of the disease. (L-R) Cecelia Gilbeau, Sandra Amyotte, Dottie Griffith, Kit Robertson, Gale Carlson, Laura Youngbird, Ella Vogel. The shawls were lovingly made by community elders. Grand Portage is the first community to work with the American Indian Cancer Foundation. The Stonebridge Singers, the host drum, played a victory song in honor of these “warrior women.” Above: The Grand Entry on Saturday, August 11 was a feast of sound and color. Right: Seven Grand Portage women were given a special pink shawl in memory of a loved one lost to cancer or in honor of their survival of the disease. (L-R) Cecelia Gilbeau, Sandra Amyotte, Dottie Griffith, Kit Robertson, Gale Carlson, Laura Youngbird, Ella Vogel. The shawls were lovingly made by community elders. Grand Portage is the first community to work with the American Indian Cancer Foundation. The Stonebridge Singers, the host drum, played a victory song in honor of these “warrior women.”


Most of all, Powwow is a time to make new friends, like these young dancers. Most of all, Powwow is a time to make new friends, like these young dancers.

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